Archive

Author Archives: creativetechlabs

Simon Popple from the University of Leeds and Imran Ali, Tom Morgan and Dean Vipond are working on a collaboration around storytelling tools for large media archives; the team has chosen to use archive media from the London Riots as content for storytellers.

We are now halfway through this project and it has been an extremely rewarding process for me. We have moved from a set of abstract ideas and aspirations to developing a set of principles and defined functions that will allow for the creation of tools that can facilitate interactive digital storytelling. We began the process by looking at basic principles and examining what tools were already out there and by defining what we wanted to create in relation to their limitations and shortcomings. This threw up a range of approaches and some interesting formats such as the Cowbird project (http://cowbird.com/) and new forms of digital storytelling software like Klynt (http://www.klynt.net/)

Once we were relatively certain of the nature of our concept we began to define core functions and to think about what users would want to do and how they could collect, interpret, repurpose and republish material and how the narratives of their own stories could be captured and shared.  We did this through Persona modelling which was a new concept to me – and which really opened my eyes to the ways in which these concepts could be built from the bottom up. I am now a convert! We decided to use the London riots as a case study and to pick examples of different participants/victims to work through how a particular story could be told and what range of materials and opinions could be used to represent it.  We are now at the stage of turning this into a series of profiles from which we are constructing the software interface and necessary functions from a user perspective. More later.

Simon Popple

Advertisements

Simon Popple from the University of Leeds and Imran Ali, Tom Morgan and Dean Vipond are working on a collaboration around storytelling tools for large media archives; the team has chosen to use archive media from the London Riots as content for storytellers.

I am very excited by the prospect of working with these guys to develop ideas that have come from two pieces of research dealing with access and use of archival resources. My initial idea is to develop an app/software that will allow people to use archival sources- films, photographs, sound files etc to develop their own personal ‘archive’ which will enable them to tell their own story and also allow them to exchange and interact with others in some form of collective creative practice.

As I said in my application for this scheme

“The idea comes from two AHRC/BBC funded KEPs centred on the role of User Generated Content (UGC) and the development of genuine democratic engagements between the public and a range of cultural institutions. My work looked at opening up the BBC’s moving image archives and in exploring what types of interaction and joint endeavour could be possible and in looking at expectations and  aspirations from a public and institutional perspective. As a consequence I am now ready to develop the next phase of this ongoing research and develop an application that can facilitate these exchanges and allow public audiences to become creative curators and to engage beyond the normative expectations of the ‘invited space’ offered by institutions. As we increasingly talk about the opportunities for self-expression and self-writing within expanding digital frames, this application could have the potential for genuine creative engagement. Organisations like the BBC, the British Library and the British Film Institute have just launched the Digital Public Space (DPS) which is a collaborative archive- of-archives built on the notion of free ‘democratic’ exchanges and in which acts of self-writing and the ‘national conversation’ can take place. This clearly signals a huge shift in the idea of ownership and the insularity of major institutions and offers the potential for exciting application development that would allow the public to take full advantage of increasingly available cultural resources and would be something that is not collection/institution specific.”

I hope that the project will allow me the opportunity to begin to explore the potential of this type of activity through a collaborative form of digital storytelling and to bottom-out some of its complexities and implications and to examine just what is possible in terms of design and interactivity. I expect to find it is a complex process!

Simon Popple

Ben Eaton and Kevin Macnish

Ben Eaton, a digital artist, and Kevin Macnish, from the University of Leeds, are exploring the ethics of contemporary warfare using game platforms.

“We are looking at creating a practical sandbox-like environment within which to explore the applications of ethical questions as posed by the shifting nature of contemporary combat. At this early stage we are experimenting with creating custom mods for pre-existing 3D game platforms that can be employed in a teaching environment creating a networked interactive experience for multiple students and a session leader to simultaneously participate and enact various scenarios.”

Dave Lynch and Vlad Strukov

Vlad Strukov, a researcher from the University of Leeds, and Dave Lynch, an artist, are exploring the nature of data by using projections on clouds.

“The collaboration looks at the application and interpretation of images projected onto clouds.  The project concerns itself with the nature of data and the human ability to interpret, own and share data. Particularly, the project looks at the emotive as well as political potential of data in its ability to mobilise, create and translate meaning.”

Bloom and The Centre for Translation Studies

Bloom, a digital discovery agency, and the Centre for Translation Studies at the University of Leeds are working on improving collaborative translations.

“We are working together to model interactions between participants in collaborative translation, with a view to identifying opportunities to optimise workflow and to improve pedagogic scenarios for training students in higher education and continuing professional development contexts. In order to do this, we have built profiles of the social interactions among participants in four translation projects. We have also recorded evaluation data, with scores provided for each project by each member of the translation team involved, as well as the commissioners/users of the translation. Our evaluation framework provides parameters relating to aspects of the end product (the translation), as well as the collaborative processes through which it was produced.

The next step is to see whether we find correlations between the evaluation data and patterns in the interaction profile for each project.”

Simon Popple, Imran Ali, Tom Morgan and Dean Vipond

Simon Popple from the University of Leeds and Imran Ali, Tom Morgan and Dean Vipond are working on a collaboration around storytelling tools for large media archives; the team has chosen to use archive media from the London Riots as content for storytellers.

more details to be announced.